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The Openist - Podcast of Democracy Cafe/Socrates Cafe
A Fresh Taste of World-Viewing & World Making
Category: Society & Culture
Location: SocratesCafe.com
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I'm the founder of Socrates Cafe -- see SocratesCafe.com -- and a noted author (Socrates Cafe: A Fresh Taste of Philosophy, The...


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November 13, 2018 08:18 AM PST

Rock and Latin music writer and curator Isabela Raygoza has opened my world to an array of artists and great music that I otherwise would not be privy to. She provides vistas, contexts and perspectives that help me and many others see how this rich artistry both stems from and drives American democracy, identity, and greater gender equality at this critical moment.

I once had the honor of having Isabela as a student of mine when I was professor of the graduate Thesis Writing course for the Department of Media, Culture and Communication at New York University. She has gone on to do great things, including writing regularly for publications like Rolling Stone, Remezcla and VICE.

Listen in as Isabela shares her compelling take on the music and democracy scene.

October 31, 2018 12:47 PM PDT

Can religion be allowed to control us? What is country? Why is it that some of us don't believe in God? What makes women strong?

Such are the timely, timeless and incredibly bold questions explored so far at the newest Socrates Cafes, started by a young women in the Middle East.

Socrates Cafe has taken off in a big way there (my book "Socrates Cafe" soon will be published in Arabic). It now has expanded in Saudi Arabia (which already has thriving groups in Saihat and Qatif) to Al-Ahsa, a major city in the eastern province, as well as to nearby Bahrain, where participants hail from from Kuwait, Oman, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia -- thanks in large measure to Noor Al-Hajji, a graduate student at Arabian Gulf University who has an abiding passion for philosophical inquiry the Socrates Cafe way.

Listen in as Noor eloquently relates why she believes Socrates Cafe must become an ever more vital mainstay in the Middle East at this critical crossroads. It was thrilling and humbling to me that she believes Socrates Cafe will serve as a lasting legacy, and hence continue to thrive long after my mortal moment is done. "I am so thankful for the brilliant idea of Socrates Cafes," she tells me with palpable enthusiasm, "that I will spread it everywhere I can."

October 08, 2018 11:44 AM PDT

In 1998, 'Civic ideals: Conflicting Visions of citizenship in U. S. History,' was a finalist for the 1998 Pulitzer Prize in History. If anything, the comprehensively insightful award-winning book -- authored by Rogers Smith, who until 2001 was Alfred Cowles Professor of Government at Yale University before then becoming the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science -- is more relevant today than ever.

As Yale University Press, the publisher of 'Civic Ideals,' notes, it "traces political struggles over U.S. citizenship laws from the colonial period through the Progressive era and shows that throughout this time, most adults were legally denied access to full citizenship, including political rights, solely because of their race, ethnicity, or gender. Basic conflicts over these denials have driven political development and civic membership in the U.S., Smith argues. These conflicts are what truly define U.S. civic identity up to this day."

And as Rogers Smiths shares in our thoughtful podcast give-and-take, 'Civic Ideals' "does focus on dimensions of American life that I would like to see eclipsed, including the impulses to exclude and subordinate some and privilege others. But I’m afraid we do see those impulses today."

While these impulses may not be on a more pervasive scale than ever today, Professor Smith believes "there is a significant uptick. The concerns about immigration in this country and also economic inequality, as well as cultural trends away from traditional forms of life, all these have created a mounting longing on the part of many Americans for their vision of an older America that they regard as a better America."

"Unfortunately," he continues, "that is an America that privileged whites, and especially white Christian men, over all others— and we’re seeing renewed efforts to try to reconstruct to some degree that predominately white-governed and -dominated America."

While Dr. Smith, an expert on civil rights and constitutional law, goes on to assert that "we’re not going to recreate that vision as true as it was in the past," he considers it nonetheless "disturbing to see that vision of America on the rise again.”

Listen in as I explore this phenomenon of civic ideals and identity, and much more (including the President's pardoning powers -- and whether he can pardon himself), with Professor Smith.

October 01, 2018 10:56 AM PDT

"A question for you: knowledge and understanding -- how do the words and concepts themselves differ in your eyes?"

That was the message I received from Claire Diao, a very thoughtful former student at University of Vermont who is now applying to study at Brown University even as she continues to work as a bartender.

It's been a long time since I've enjoyed a one-on-one Socratic give-and-take as much as I did this one with Claire, as we explore together the very question she posed to me.

Listen in and you just might find yourself moving further along your own path towards achieving greater wisdom, as I did thanks to Claire.

September 21, 2018 10:58 AM PDT

Democratic freedoms are on the decline. What can be done to arrest this pernicious development and make sure freedom rings the world over?

Michael J. Abramowitz, president of Freedom House (freedomhouse.org), an independent watchdog organization that supports democratic change and monitors the status of freedom around the world, has an array of timely insights on the matter. 

Michael - who before joining Freedom House in February 2017 was director of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Levine Institute for Holocaust Education, and before that was National Editor and White House correspondent for the Washington Post -- discusses Freedom House's annual report, 'Freedom of the World,' which they've been producing for nearly a half century. Its key indicators -- which track everything from freedom of the press, to rule of law, to free and fair elections -- show that, as Michael puts it, "after a long period of steady growth of democratization....you've had kind of a reversal of that over the last twelve years... More countries are suffering a decline in political rights and civil liberties."

There is much that can and must be done, as Michael eloquently shares, if this trend is to be reversed. Listen in.

And deepest thanks as always to our engineer Odin Halvorson, who also is an exquisite writer, among many other things. Visit his website at OdinHalvorson.com

September 14, 2018 05:24 PM PDT

When Joaquin Gonzalez heard about the effort of Harvard Law Professor Lawrence Lessig and other compatriots to challenge and prospectively overhaul the 'unrepresentative' way Electoral College votes are distributed via a winner-take-all system, he immediately reached out to offer his services and help bring a lawsuit in Texas.

To Joaquin, a recent graduate of Yale Law School, radically changing the way the Electoral College operates is a key way to bring about a more egalitarian and participatory democracy --- his paramount aim.

As Lessig readily recognized, Joaquin is a force to be reckoned with, and he enlisted him at once to join in the admirable effort. Joaquin, 33, based in San Antonio, where his family is from, is the recipient of the 2018 Shirley Adelson Siegel Public Interest Fellowship. As part of his fellowship, he is working at the Texas Civil Rights Project on voting rights issues and election protection in Texas. TCRP is a Texas-based nonprofit which in its twenty-six year history has brought thousands of strategic lawsuits to protect and expand voting rights, challenge the injustices in our broken criminal justice system, and advance racial and economic justice.

Listen in as Joaquin explains why he feels it incumbent to become a foot soldier in this effort and do all he can to make the Electoral College at long last an entity that contributes to a more representative democracy.

[Apologies for the brief glitch at about the 2:50 mark in this. It just is for a second or two, then smooths out.]

September 13, 2018 09:14 AM PDT

Our representative democracy is more and more unrepresentative. As Lawrence Lessig asserts, American voters are being "essentially silenced by constitutional inequality."

This is made abundantly evident by the winner take all system that pervades the way nearly all states allocate electoral votes -- and yet this system isn't at all mandated by the Constitution; rather, it's been created by the states. The tragic result of denying proportionality in distributing electoral votes is that millions of votes for presidential candidates effectively don't count. It's downright undemocratic.

This is an ever more alarming predicament, as the winner take all system increasingly likens the odds that we'll face more presidential election outcomes in which the candidate with the least votes wins.

Listen in as Lessig, Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard University, shares how he and other concerned citizens are taking on the existing system. As Lessig puts it, such vitally needed change can only come to pass "if we fuel it bottom up."

Our Founders and Framers would be proud of the effort being waged. And Lessig just might convince that you have a key role to play in making our republic a genuinely representative one once again.

We'll have a follow-on podcast on Sunday, the day before Constitution Day, that features Joaquim Gonzalez, a graduate of Yale law school and foot soldier based in San Antonio who has joined the effort of Lessig and company to take on the winner take all system in Texas, which is one of four states -- two red states and two blue states -- that are being sued.

And on Monday, Constitution Day, during our 6th annual Conversation with the Constitution in San Antonio, hundreds of concerned citizens of all ages and walks of life will join me in exploring how the Electoral College winner take all system is abrogating the 'one person one vote' ethos embedded in our Constitution, and hence standing in the way of making our democracy more, well, democratic.

Thanks as always to our volunteer wunderkind Odin Halvorson working his magic on this podcast. His website is OdinHalvorson.com

[Friends, if you believe in our mission at Democracy Cafe and like our work, please consider supporting us via this Paypal link: https://www.paypal.me/DemocracyCafe ]

September 10, 2018 04:51 PM PDT

Kathy Cadwell is my kind of educator -- she is dynamic, passionate, curious, and best of all, equips her charges not just to lead the classroom, but to take leadership roles in the community.

A teacher at Harwood Union High School in Moretown, Vermont, Kathy has had a Socrates Cafe for students and the community for a decade (and I've had the privilege and honor of visiting twice to hold Socratic inquiries, give workshops and presentations). She also was one of the select few to be named a Rowland Fellow in 2016.

Listen in as Kathy shares her philosophy of living, learning, and changing the world, one student at a time.

Be sure also to check out her website: https://katherinecadwell.wordpress.com/
And here's a link to a very compelling Ted Talk she gave: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzQhiB2EOVE

Here also is an article about my most recent visit to her school -- the students themselves facilitated the give-and-take when we broke into smaller groups (sure hope to return soon! I learn so much from everyone there, Kathy in particular) https://www.google.com/search?q=socrates+cafe+harwood+unino&oq=socrates+cafe+harwood+unino&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i65l3.12487j0j9&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

September 06, 2018 09:34 AM PDT

I had the great pleasure and honor of picking the brain of the celebrated, award-winning journalist and author James Fallows, who with his wife Deborah co-scribed Our Towns: A 100,000 Mile Journey into the Heart of America.

It is a sumptuous read, as sweeping as it is intimate. I can't recommend it highly enough; it is that absorbing and insightful.

As Jim eloquently shares with me, the American affinity for affiliation, for organization, for association still thrives "more than we expected and more than many would expect."

Tocqueville himself likely would be most pleased that "the agglutinative nature of the American people," as Jim puts it, remains as singularly distinctive and inventive as ever, at least among the communities that he and Deborah visited.

Be sure also to visit the website OurTownsBook.com

Now, listen in as Jim recounts their fascinating years-long journey via prop plane that Jim piloted across an America that still 'works.' [And I apologize that it's a bit echo-y on my end, but I had unexpected travels and hence had to record from a hotel room.]

August 28, 2018 09:36 AM PDT

Paul Martin is a beloved mentor. He is the founder and Chief Investment Officer of Martin Capital Advisors (MartinCapital.com), for which I'm an Investment Advisor Representative, an inveterate Socratic questioner, philanthropist, and all-around fabulous human being.

The epitome of a person who continually wonders and inquires -- and hence establishes a beachhead against stupidity -- Paul models a way of being and doing that sets a high bar.

"As long as you say to yourself, maybe I don't know everything, then you're open to inquiry," Paul asserts. "What drives stupidity is a lack of inquiry" and the concomitant sense of wonder with which inquiry is entwined.

Listen in as Paul -- a graduate of St. John's College and erstwhile commander of a reserve Navy SEAL unit -- compellingly challenges much of the conventional wisdom of 'experts' when it comes to investing, the stock market, and the economy as a whole.

In the process, you might well discover how better to create a roadmap for achieving greater excellence -- what the Greeks of old called 'arete' - in all dimensions of life.

[I apologize about the staticky quality of a bit of this give and take, due to a glitch on my end.]

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